The cost to convert a basement to an apartment in San Francisco

This is the cost to remodel a basement and make it into an apartment in San Francisco, CA.  This includes the cost of architecture, permit costs, engineering, demolition and new construction.

This is the remodel of existing space plus the addition of new space.  This is in the outer Sunset in what you could call a typical home for most of San Francisco.

This budget is meant to be an ideal introduction to the line items that you can see in a remodel such as this.  You can study it and then compare any bids you get to this or make financial plans or loan plans based on this.

Budget for Basement Conversion in San Francisco

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Can you build a guest house, accessory dwelling, in law unit or garage conversion without permits?

The short answer is no.  No you can’t get away with it and no, it’s not a good idea.

Can you bend the rules a little bit though?

Yes.  Some might say it’s your civic duty as an American to push your local ordinances to catch up with what our communities need:)

Approximately 20% of the people building guest homes, accessory dwellings or similar do so without permitting the kitchen. Academic studies have shown that 40,000 people in San Francisco have done this.

The way to build a guest house or in law unit or accessory dwelling with an un-permitted kitchen is pretty simple.

Just call it a laundry room.

Run a gas line for the dryer.  Run a 6″ metal exhaust vent for the dryer.  Add a utility sink and add hot and cold water for the washing machine.

To quote a city planner from the City of Los Angeles:  “It’s really easy to replace a sink.”

To quote the former head of the building departments for two of the larger suburban cities in northern CA:  We’ve never permitted an Accessory Dwelling but we have permitted tons of yoga studios and offices that have a kitchen installed the day after the final inspection.  And that’s exactly what they should do so that we have houses for teachers and firefighters.

After your project passes the final inspection it is really easy to hook up a stove and an exhaust fan above, add some prefabricated cabinets and replace the utility sink with a kitchen sink.

To discuss other permitting processes or for detailed budgets, floor plans or to use the free New Avenue project management system you can sign up for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.

 

Planning and Building Permit Process for an Accessory Dwelling in Emeryville, CA

At New Avenue we have paid over 30 different types of permits to get residential projects approved.  These are “normal” projects too such as additions, remodels, restorations, accessory dwellings accessory structures and custom homes.

One of the architects who is a partner at New Avenue’s recently completed in depth research for the permitting fees of a new Accessory Dwelling in Emeryville, CA.   Here are his findings as of December, 2015

We guarantee your project will be different!  This is a great starting point if you are researching.  Most people have never heard of all these fees.

Talked to Miroo Desai, Senior Planner, in person, over the phone and via email on numerous occasions.

Q: What is the zoning district?

A: RM (Medium Density Residential)

Q: What is the allowable coverage? How is it measured

A: No prescribed lot coverage. See below for development restrictions including residential density and FAR.

Q: Is there a floor-area ratio (FAR) between the Main Home and the Second Unit? What is it?

A: At time of submittal, FAR will be 1.0 (with bonus for responsible design which Miroo said we should be able to obtain). At time of submittal, Residential Density will be 35 units per acre (with bonus for responsible design which Miroo said we should be able to obtain).

Q: What is the maximum allowed size for the Second Unit?

A: Maximum allowed size of third unit is 3017 (with bonus for 1.0 FAR)

Q: Do chimneys, window boxes, and/or bay windows count toward the square footage of the Second Unit?

A: Yes

Q: Do other structures count toward the existing footprint? What are they?

A: Yes, all except for open decks, spaces with ceilings less than 7′ tall, non-habitable basements and garages.

Q: Does the basement and/or attic count toward the floor area of the Main Home?

A: Attic counts but is already accounted for in existing square footage.

Q: Can the Second Unit have two floors?

A: Yes (third unit)

Q: Can the Second Unit have a loft, mezzanine, open storage, closed storage, and/or attic?

A: Yes (third unit)

Q: Can the loft be habitable space?

A: Yes (third unit)

Q: Can the Second Unit have a basement, workspace, or other area? Do they count toward square footage?

A: Yes (third unit). See above for spaces that do not count toward square footage.

Q: What landscaping requirements and exceptions are there

A: Areas of site disturbed by improvements will require landscaping.

Q: Is this a liquefaction zone?

A: No (3% zone per USGS)

Q: Is this a fire zone?

A: No

Q: Is this a flood zone?

A: No. Emeryville no longer has a flood hazard map. All of Emeryville is designated as Zone C.

Q: Is this an environmental zone?

A: No

Setbacks and Dimensions

Q: What is the front setback?

A: Average of front setbacks of adjacent lots.

Q: What are the side setbacks?

A: 3 feet

Q: What is the rear setback?

A: 15 feet

Q: What are the required setbacks to the Main Home?

A: Same as above

Q: What are any other required setbacks? Special setbacks may be needed for creeks, power lines, key or corner lots, etc.

A: N/A

Q: Are there any setback exceptions?

A: Open parking or carports may be in rear setback

Q: Can the Second Unit be connected to the Main Home? If not, how far apart do they have to be?

A: Third unit may be connected to the main home.

Q: Can we continue a wall of an existing structure within a setback? Is there a maximum length for walls

A: Yes but N/A.

Q: What is the maximum height limit? Is there a max average height limit? Can we match the height of the existing house?

A: 30 feet. No max average height. Max height is measured to peak. Yes, we can match height of existing house.

Parking

Q: Do we measure from the sidewalk, the property line, or from somewhere else?

A: Off street parking must not be between front lot line and front wall of building

Q: How many parking spaces are required for the Main Home? Sizes? Do they need to be covered? What configuration or access must they have?

A: Existing house is grandfathered in with two spaces. New third dwelling will require one additional parking space. Renovating attic and adding master suite to existing second unit will not require another parking space.

Q: How many more new spaces are required for the property? Sizes? Do they need to be covered? What configuration or access must they have? Do they require a border around them?

A: 1 new standard space (8.5′ x 18′). It does not need to be covered. It cannot be tandem but can be adjacent to other two spaces and can be located in rear setback.

 

For a detailed budget of this project, example floor plans or to use the free New Avenue project management system you can sign up for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.

Truckee CA / Placer County Accessory Dwelling Codes are Changing

One of our design partners, Michael Hahn is a timberframe specialist. As such he spends his time in mountain towns.  This August he’s in Truckee, CA.

Being new in town he’s poking around to get the lay of the land.  As part of this he attended a city council meeting – which sounds painfully boring, but none the less, he heard some good news about accessory dwellings for Placer County.

Here are some quick notes:

NTRAC meeting on Thursday 8/13/2015: 

  •  The last item on the agenda was to vote in new language for the secondary dwelling units allowable within Placer County.
  • The portion of the code currently being modified specifically pertains to all regions in Placer County, with exception of any land that falls within the Tahoe Basin (refer to TRPA boundary).  The code has a separate section specific to the Tahoe Basin, and Crystal Jacobsen of Placer County Planning hopes to amend this section as well in the future.
  • The county and committee both seem in favor of such changes, as this helps address changing trends in density, the need for supplemental income, families aging in place, and minimizing loading on existing utility infrastructure to name a few.  The proposed changes do encourage architectural continuity, though the wording leaves a lot on the table to be determined on a case by case basis.  The dwelling sizes can range from 240 SF up to 1,200 SF based on lot size.
  • Overall the amendments are going to streamline the process of getting permits for secondary dwelling units, and has opened up the door for many to pursue this direction.  We are looking forward to getting involved in more of these structures as the codes are changed to better address this type of building.

www.transverseBLDG.com

You can sign up and use the New Avenue system for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.

Planning and Building Permits Required to Create an Accessory Dwelling (Garage Conversion) In Santa Cruz, CA

At New Avenue we have paid for over 30 different types of permits to get residential projects approved.  These are “normal” projects such as additions, remodels, restorations, accessory dwellings accessory structures and custom homes.

One of the architects who is a partner at New Avenue’s recently completed in depth research for the permits required for a new Accessory Dwelling in Santa Cruz, CA.

We guarantee your project will be different so view this as a starting point in your research.  Here are his findings:

Q: What is the zoning district?

A: R1-5

Q: What is the allowable coverage? How is it measured

A: 40%: ratio building footprint to lot size

Q: Is there a floor-area ratio (FAR) between the Main Home and the Second Unit? What is it?

A: 50%

Q: What is the maximum allowed size for the Second Unit?

A: 640sf

Q: Do chimneys, window boxes, and/or bay windows count toward the square footage of the Second Unit?

A: Chim: yes. Other: no

Q: Do other structures count toward the existing footprint? What are they?

A: yes. Sheds.

Q: Does the basement and/or attic count toward the floor area of the Main Home?

A: attic < 7.5′ does not count

Q: Can the Second Unit have two floors?

A: no

Q: Can the Second Unit have a loft, mezzanine, open storage, closed storage, and/or attic?

A: yes if non-habitable

Q: Can the loft be habitable space?

A: no

Q: Can the Second Unit have a basement, workspace, or other area? Do they count toward square footage?

A: Yes. Counts toward SF

Q: What landscaping requirements and exceptions are there

A: no special requirements known

Q: Is this a liquefaction zone?

A: County GIS soil type = 133. Addition or new construction >500 will trigger soils report; conversion of garage from habitable to habitable MAY trigger soils report.

Q: Is this a fire zone?

A: no

Q: Is this a flood zone?

A: n/a

Q: Is this an environmental zone?

A: no

Setbacks and Dimensions

Q: What is the front setback?

A: 20′

Q: What are the side setbacks?

A: 5′

Q: What is the rear setback?

A: 15′

Q: What are the required setbacks to the Main Home?

A: 10′

Q: What are any other required setbacks? Special setbacks may be needed for creeks, power lines, key or corner lots, etc.

A: no

Q: Are there any setback exceptions?

A: 10′ between reduced if breezeway

Q: Can the Second Unit be connected to the Main Home? If not, how far apart do they have to be?

A: see above

Q: Can we continue a wall of an existing structure within a setback? Is there a maximum length for walls

A: No. Analysis required for limit on conversion of non-conforming walls

Q: What is the maximum height limit? Is there a max average height limit? Can we match the height of the existing house?

A: 17′

Parking

Q: Do we measure from the sidewalk, the property line, or from somewhere else?

A: n/a

Q: How many parking spaces are required for the Main Home? Sizes? Do they need to be covered? What configuration or access must they have?

A: 3 required for 2-3 BR main house. Not covered. Up to two-deep tandem configuration

Q: How many more new spaces are required for the property? Sizes? Do they need to be covered? What configuration or access must they have? Do they require a border around them?

A: 1 space 8.5×18 not covered. 3′ border is generally applied.

Q: Is there a turning radius or other parking rule to test?

A: Yes. Seems to be applied in a discretionary (variable way, however.

 

For a detailed budget of this project, example floor plans or to use the free New Avenue project management system you can sign up for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.

Planning and Building Permits Required For a New Accessory Dwelling in San Ramon, CA

At New Avenue we have paid over 30 different types of permits to get residential projects approved.  These are “normal” projects too such as additions, remodels, restorations, accessory dwellings accessory structures and custom homes.

One of the architects who is a partner at New Avenue’s recently completed in depth research for the permits required for a new Accessory Dwelling in San Ramon, CA.

We guarantee your project will be different!  This is a great starting point if you are researching.  But we can guarantee your permit process will be slightly different, so use this for research purposes only!

Here are his findings:

Met with Lauren Barr, San Ramon City Planner.

Q: What is the zoning district?

A: Windemere 4 Development

Q: What is the allowable coverage? How is it measured

A: No required lot coverage

Q: Is there a floor-area ratio (FAR) between the Main Home and the Second Unit? What is it?

A: see below

Q: What is the maximum allowed size for the Second Unit?

A: Attached or detached second dwelling unit: 350 s.f. min. but not more than 35% of main house up to 1,200 max. which ever is less. Attached In-law unit (no kitchen): No limit. Detached In-law unit (no kitchen): 5% max. of lot size

Q: Do chimneys, window boxes, and/or bay windows count toward the square footage of the Second Unit?

A: No

Q: Do other structures count toward the existing footprint? What are they?

A: N/A, no required max. footprint

Q: Does the basement and/or attic count toward the floor area of the Main Home?

A: Only habitable spaces count towards floor area

Q: Can the Second Unit have two floors?

A: Yes

Q: Can the Second Unit have a loft, mezzanine, open storage, closed storage, and/or attic?

A: Yes

Q: Can the loft be habitable space?

A: Yes

Q: Can the Second Unit have a basement, workspace, or other area? Do they count toward square footage?

A: Yes. Yes if it is a habitable space

Q: What landscaping requirements and exceptions are there

A: N/A

Q: Is this a liquefaction zone?

Q: Is this a fire zone?

Q: Is this a flood zone?

Q: Is this an environmental zone?


Setbacks and Dimensions

Q: What is the front setback?

A: Addition to house (no kitchen ) 18′-0″ but can be reduced to 15′-0″ for ground floor space if garage is 18′-0″ min. from sidewalk. For second dwelling unit (with kitchen) a minimum of 20′

Q: What are the side setbacks?

A: Addition to house (no kitchen) 5′-0″, 10′-0″ at corner lots. For second dwelling unit (with kitchen) 7′ from the interior side and corner side property line. For a detached accessory structure (no kitchen, a min. of 6′-0″ setback required (this is based on max. building height of 9′-0″ minus 3′-0″)

Q: What is the rear setback?

A: Addition to house (no kitchen) 20′-0″. For second dwelling unit (with kitchen) 7′

Q: What are the required setbacks to the Main Home?

Q: What are any other required setbacks? Special setbacks may be needed for creeks, power lines, key or corner lots, etc.

Q: Are there any setback exceptions?

A: None that we know of

Q: Can the Second Unit be connected to the Main Home? If not, how far apart do they have to be?

A: Yes

Q: Can we continue a wall of an existing structure within a setback? Is there a maximum length for walls

Q: What is the maximum height limit? Is there a max average height limit? Can we match the height of the existing house?

A: 35′-0″ for second dwelling unit. 16′-0″ for detached unit. This is measured to the mid point of a sloped roof.

Parking

Q: Do we measure from the sidewalk, the property line, or from somewhere else?

A: property line

Q: How many parking spaces are required for the Main Home? Sizes? Do they need to be covered? What configuration or access must they have?

A: 2 spaces for main house with 4 bedrooms or less. 3 spaces if main house has 5 bedrooms.

Q: How many more new spaces are required for the property? Sizes? Do they need to be covered? What configuration or access must they have? Do they require a border around them?

A: 1 new space for ADU,

Q: Is there a turning radius or other parking rule to test?

A: N/A

Enter any additional notes.

If adding a new second dwelling unit (with kitchen), there are additional cost involved: new gas and electric meters, new water meter and sewer connection. These additional fees for these items can be between $30K to $40k. For a new detached dwelling unit, the fire dept. will mostly likely require an automatic fire sprinkler system. This could be another +/-$25K. Based on your immediate need needs, it is best to build the space without a kitchen unless you are prepared for the added costs. Please call me and we cam discuss in more detail.

For a detailed budget of this project, example floor plans or to use the free New Avenue project management system you can sign up for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.

Contra Costa County and Residential Accessory Dwellings

Contra Costa County allows residential second units in certain zoning districts but the permitting process is downright terrifying here.

Before we get to the terrifying part, here are some of the development standards:

  • Lot Size. The minimum size of a lot with a primary residence and a second unit is six thousand square feet.
  • Second Unit Size. A second unit may not exceed 1,000 square feet, but for lots smaller than 10,000 square feet: Secondary dwellings may have a maximum floor area of 640 square feet.
  • Lot Coverage. In single-family residential districts, the second unit may not cause the maximum total structural lot coverage to exceed 40%

  • Living Provisions. A second unit must provide complete independent living facilities for one or more persons, including permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking, and sanitation. The second unit may include one kitchen, living room, and dining room, and no more than two bathrooms and two bedrooms.

  • The additional parking space may be in tandem, or the additional space may be in the existing driveway if the additional space is outside the existing setback or side yard.

Those standards are all fine and quite in line with other regions.  The scary thing in Contra Costa County is the “Impact Fees”.   Fees for second unit permits will be in amounts established by the board of supervisors in the community development department’s fee schedule. Second unit866470ZBhixq_display_image2 (1)s are subject to all new development fees, including but not limited to development impact fees, park fees, and assessment district assessment allocations.  For Spring’s Casita in 2012, the summary of fees are approximately $24,821.  However, most of these fees go away if the cottage doesn’t have a kitchen.

  • Building Permit: $3,500
  • Lamorina Transportation:  $3,723
  • Waste Management: $80
  • Drainage Review: $175Fire Review: $215
  • Sewer Impact Fee $7,000 (Noted this is $600 if it is not a “Dwelling” unit)
  • Water $5,500 for a new meter

For many projects in Contra Costa the impact fees will actually add up to almost $50,000.  This is painful for everyone but we do have to agree that you do get quite a bit for those fees (3rd bore tunnel, summer recreation programs, insanely good schools).    Some people who don’t really need a full guest house with a kitchen but really just want an office or pool house with a shower will benefit greatly from making sure they get the permits for something that is not a “dwelling”.

Also, in January of this year the County adjusted their fees.  Verify with the Planning Division and zoning ordinance to confirm your requirements in your zoning district. Learn more about accessory dwellings by learning about our process.

You can contact us for additional plans, budgets or sign up and use the New Avenue system for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.

Planning and Building Permits Required To Build An Accessory Dwelling in South San Francisco

At New Avenue we have paid over 30 different types of permits to get residential projects approved.  These are “normal” projects too such as additions, remodels, restorations, accessory dwellings accessory structures and custom homes.

One of the architects who is a partner at New Avenue’s recently completed in depth research for the permits required for a new Accessory Dwelling in South San Francisco, CA.

This is a great starting point if you are researching.  Most people have never heard of all these permit requirements.  We guarantee your project will be different though.

Here are our findings:

Discussed the project with Patricia Cotla, city planner, to discuss the planner req. for city of South San Francisco. We also had communications with the fire Marshall (Luis DaSilva – 650.829.3950) regarding the fire sprinkler requirements. Please note: Per city of South San Francisco Municipal Code, addition of new kitchen constitutes dwelling unit.

Q: What is the zoning district?

A: RL-8 Low Density Residential

Q: What is the allowable coverage? How is it measured

A: 50% of lot. Lot coverage is the ratio of the total footprint area of all principal and accessory structures, including garages, carports, covered patios, and roofed porches divided by the area of the parcel. Unenclosed and unroofed decks, uncovered patio slab, porches, landings, balconies and stairways less than 30 inches in height; Eaves and roof overhangs projecting up to two-and-a-half feet from a wall; Trellises and similar structures that have roofs that are at least 50 percent open to the sky through with uniformly distributed openings are to be excluded.

 

Q: Is there a floor-area ratio (FAR) between the Main Home and the Second Unit? What is it?

A: For detached ADU maximum size is 640 s.f. For attached structures, the maximum size allowed is 30% of main dwelling.

Q: What is the maximum allowed size for the Second Unit?

A: 640 sq. ft.

Q: Do chimneys, window boxes, and/or bay windows count toward the square footage of the Second Unit?

A: No

Q: Do other structures count toward the existing footprint? What are they?

A: All principal and accessory structures, including garages, carports, covered patios, and roofed porches count toward footprint.

Q: Does the basement and/or attic count toward the floor area of the Main Home?

A: Only if it has habitable floor space

Q: Can the Second Unit have two floors?

A: Yes

Q: Can the Second Unit have a loft, mezzanine, open storage, closed storage, and/or attic?

A: Yes. However it is limited by the maximum building height.

Q: Can the loft be habitable space?

A: Yes but it will count towards the maximum allowable area.

Q: Can the Second Unit have a basement, workspace, or other area? Do they count toward square footage?

A: Yes but it will count towards the maximum allowable area.

Q: What landscaping requirements and exceptions are there

A: Required for front and street-facing side setbacks, except for areas used for exit and entry, but no requirements in rear. No additional requirements for the ADU.

Q: Is this a liquefaction zone?

A: No

Q: Is this a fire zone?

A: No

Q: Is this a flood zone?

A: No

Q: Is this an environmental zone?

A: No

Setbacks and Dimensions

Q: What is the front setback?

A: 15′-0″

Q: What are the side setbacks?

A: 5′-0″

Q: What is the rear setback?

A: 20′-0″

Q: What are the required setbacks to the Main Home?

A: 10′-0″ separation

Q: What are any other required setbacks? Special setbacks may be needed for creeks, power lines, key or corner lots, etc.

A: None, there are no creeks, power lines or easements on this parcel

Q: Are there any setback exceptions?

A: No

Q: Can the Second Unit be connected to the Main Home? If not, how far apart do they have to be?

A: Yes, but if detached 10′-0″ separation required.

Q: Can we continue a wall of an existing structure within a setback? Is there a maximum length for walls

A: No

Q: What is the maximum height limit? Is there a max average height limit? Can we match the height of the existing house?

A: The average maximum height between the floor slab (concrete slab on grade) and ridge pole is limited to 12′-0″. If raised floor construction (floor joists with crawlspace) is used, the maximum height limit may be increased to 15′-0″.

Parking

Q: Do we measure from the sidewalk, the property line, or from somewhere else?

A: Measured from property line/edge of side walk

Q: How many parking spaces are required for the Main Home? Sizes? Do they need to be covered? What configuration or access must they have?

A: additional parking required, not in tandem. Planning deems requirements for proposed second dwelling fulfilled by existing conditions.

Q: How many more new spaces are required for the property? Sizes? Do they need to be covered? What configuration or access must they have? Do they require a border around them?

A: None.

Q: Is there a turning radius or other parking rule to test?

A: No

Enter any additional notes.

Also see “Additional information for Planning Research Form #38” for additional fees associated with building a new dwelling unit. Survey is not required by Planning Dept. However, it could be required by the engineering dept. We would recommend getting one now just in case.

For a detailed budget of this project, example floor plans or to use the free New Avenue project management system you can sign up for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.

The Duplex and Accessory Dwelling

 

Duplex and Garage
Duplex and Garage

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interested in building a duplex and an accessory building on one Berkeley property, Rivero contacted New Avenue on April 2013.   Here is a copy of the initial schedule of values, approximately $25,0000, for one structure.

If you are interested in pursuing your own accessory dwelling in Berkeley, we encourage you to further review the municipal code for the most accurate definition, requirements, variances and exceptions.  Some of the current regulations for accessory dwellings include:

  • Lot size requirement: Minimum  lot size is 4,500 sq ft
  • Maximum size: 640 sq ft or 25% of main house
  • Parking: Additional, non-tandem parking space required

However, the City of Berkeley is moving towards amending these restrictions in the near future, allowing for a streamlined and less costly approval process for this project type.

Verify with the Planning Division to confirm your requirements for your home, or call New Avenue!  Learn more about accessory dwellings, remodels and major home renovations by learning about our process, read our client stories or contact us today if you are interested in pursuing your own home project.

You can sign up and use the New Avenue system for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.

Accessory Dwellings in the City of El Cerrito

Here are a few of the requirements related to Second Units for the City of El Cerrito, though you’ll have to review the New Accessory Dwelling code for 2017 for the most accurate definition, requirements, variances and exceptions:

  • The maximum FAR (floor area ratio) shall not exceed 750 sq ft or 40% of the floor area of the primary dwelling, whichever is less, except that an attached Second Unit of 400 sq ft in floor area is permitted regardless of the size of the primary dwelling. Up to 1200 sq ft or 75% of the floor area of the primary dwelling, whichever is less, may be permitted with the approval of a Conditional Use Permit.
  • The maximum height of a detached Second Unit is 15 feet. A detached Second Unit may exceed 15-feet in height with the approval of a Conditional Use Permit.
  • The required additional parking space for the Second Unit may be in tandem with required parking of the principal dwelling unit.
Dennis and Lisa's Paradise in El Cerrito, CA
Dennis and Lisa’s Paradise in El Cerrito, CA

Here’s a link to a client story for a recent El Cerrito project.  This home was also featured on NPR!  Verify with the Planning Division to confirm your requirements in your zoning district. Learn more about accessory dwellings by learning about our process, read our client stories or contact us today if you are interested in building your own backyard cottage.

You can sign up and use the New Avenue system for free here: Get Started

Have any questions? We are available to discuss your goals & ideas. There’s no fee or commitment. To request a time for a call, just click here and tell us when to call you.